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What is human movement in the absence of the body? —Paul Kaiser

For the past few months, I’ve had the privilege to be invited to monthly salon meetings. Tonight, we had an interesting presentation by two dancers, one of whom is disabled. They belong to a dance company that create “opportunities for every body to discover dance and for artists with and without disabilities to access inclusive dance training. In their unique approach to art making, differences are regarded as creative strengths and different ways of moving and perceiving are celebrated for their choreographic possibilities.”

Naomi shared how they seek to draw out the unique movements of each person (each body) and then weave them together to create a beautiful mixed ability dance choreography. All can dance; all can participate. Bodies of all shapes, sizes and abilities moving together in harmony.

the disabled body changes the process of representation … Different bodies require and create new modes of representation. … Disabilities exposes with great force the constraints imposed on bodies by social codes and norms.

Tobin Siebers, Disability Theory

Inevitably, I could not help but think of how in our church gatherings, differences are often not celebrated in practice. Specifically, performances are by professionals and the rest are confined to passive spectatorship for the most part. Our communal gatherings do not reflect the perichoretic dance of the Trinity, and the participatory nature of the gathered body has largely been lost (1 Cor. 12; 14).

Where Does the Time Go?

I recently put another birthday behind me. Shortly after that, my wife and I shared a quiet and reflective anniversary dinner. So much has changed since those first magical moments when love captured our hearts.

It’s also been just over a year since my wife convinced me that we needed to make a commitment and join the church we had been attending. With some effort, I have managed to have some interaction with almost everyone, and have even forged somewhat meaningful relationships with a few people. But as for deep, close connections, that reality has not yet been realized—though I hope that one or two of these may ripen and bear the fruit of authentic Christian love.

In the meantime:

I have my books
And my poetry to protect me
I am shielded in my armor
Hiding in my room
Safe within my womb
I touch no one and no one touches me
I am a rock
I am an island

And a rock feels no pain
And an island never cries

— Simon and Garfunkel, “I Am a Rock”

Spend just half an hour reviewing the nonsense, lunacy, perversions, debauchery, abominations and crap that is modern American “christianity” and you’ll know what I mean:

http://www.piratechristian.com/museum-of-idolatry/

Warning: do not view on a full stomach

Aging Biblically

Time flies. And it flies faster each year. So don’t procrastinate.

Like a game of hot potato, you should get rid of your possessions as fast as possible. Invest everything you can in the Kingdom. Your life is going to be over any minute, and you are going to regret holding on to things you weren’t able to keep.

Danger of Elevating Men

Not surprisingly, the recent “conversion”of Hank Hanegraaff to Eastern Orthodoxy has generated a lot of confusion and discussion.

My concerns?  First of all, what is so special about Hank (“Bible Answer Man”) that Christians blindly seek him out to help them understand the Bible? There are far more knowledgeable biblical scholars and theologians who can answer questions way more accurately, and their books, —and now, thanks to the Internet— articles and lectures are readily available.

Secondly: we all have access to the same Holy Spirit to help illuminate the text as we read and study the Word of God.

But no: many Christians are too damn lazy to study the Word for themselves.

I have never cared for the “Bible Answer Man” and Hank’s recent confusion/conversion to Orthodoxy is just one more reason why I would not recommend him to anyone.

My wife and I had the opportunity to spend an evening at a salon hosted by a single mom at her home. The presenter was a young man (20 years old) who shared his life as an immigrant from Korea and his quest for identity and belonging. As a child of immigrant parents I can relate to his story and I also appreciated his honesty about trying to hold on to his Christian faith through it all.

We had an interesting and diverse group of people and we enjoyed the conversations over the potluck dinner. In many ways, though this was a non-Christian gathering, I felt it was as if I was in a house church meeting with the Lord’s Supper as a real meal (which it was) and everyone participating in the gathering (which was the norm). Even the children (including my youngest daughter) were part of the gathering: listening and interacting with the adults.

I wish I could experience genuine community in church as well …

Getting in Tune

The truth is many of us walk into worship not quite ready to worship. We need a little time to center and focus ourselves. Some of us are frustrated with our kids. Some are disheartened about our work. Some are stressed about the demands of school or the deadlines of our jobs. Others are depressed or apathetic about life. Yet others are fearful, distraught, or mourning. Weekly worship calls us back into a story with the emotional highs and lows of sin and salvation, so we all need to recalibrate.

—Zac Hicks, Lord, Tune My Heart for Worship